Resolution: Appropriate care for people with dementia

Resolution

We call upon HM Government and the NHS to provide facilities to enable carers to stay with people with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia that have been admitted into hospital.

Background

Dementia is a global health crisis affecting more people than cancer, heart disease, or stroke. In the UK it is the leading cause of death for women, and 21m people have a close friend or relative living with the condition. People with dementia occupy more than 25% of hospital beds, but being admitted can be extremely damaging to their health.

Carers are often not allowed to stay outside visiting hours. Yet their relatives can be distressed by unfamiliar surroundings, and being without their families or specialist support can actually worsen their health.

One-third of people with dementia, who are admitted to hospital for an acute – but unrelated – illness never return to their own homes.

Talking points

It is clear that despite Government guidance, not all hospitals are dementia friendly, yet. It would benefit the health of dementia patients if their carers were allowed to stay with them.

In today’s economic climate is this campaign feasible?

More information

John’s Campaign

The Alzheimer’s Society 

NFWI presentation on dementia care (PowerPoint)

Voting process

After reading the background notes, find your Resolution Selection form and make your mark (X) against the ONE resolution that you support the most.

Cut out the form and give it to Rebecca Bennett at the December meeting, or scan and send it to Rebecca at nunheadwi@gmail.com.

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Resolution: Avoid food waste, address food poverty

Resolution

The WI calls on all supermarkets to sign up to a voluntary agreement to avoid food waste, thereby passing surplus food on to charities thus helping to address the issue of increasing food poverty in the UK.’

Background

Most food distributed by food banks has been donated by consumers. Only 2% of edible surplus food discarded by supermarkets is redistributed to charities and food banks. If this was merely doubled it would save the voluntary sector £160m. In 2013-2014, food banks run by The Trussell Trust fed 913,138 people nationwide: i.e., three days’ worth of emergency food was given out by the Trust.

Supermarkets are working with charities but more effort is needed. Shops and charities have limited capacity and resources. Food waste also has an environmental cost.

Talking points

The NFWI has no current mandate to address food poverty, despite the fact that members have always been interested in this subject. This resolution would finally give us a mandate to do serious policy work on this issue.

This focus has included work on food waste. WIs already support food banks.

More information

WRAP

FareShare:

The Trussell Trust

NFWI public affairs team presentation on Avoid food waste, address food poverty (PowerPoint)

Voting process

After reading the background notes, find your Resolution Selection form and make your mark (X) against the ONE resolution that you support the most.

Cut out the form and give it to Rebecca Bennett at the December meeting, or scan and send it to Rebecca at nunheadwi@gmail.com.

Resolution: Mind or Body – equal funding for care

Resolution

The National Federation of Women’s Institutes calls upon the Government to ensure that the care of people with poor mental health receives funding and respect equal to that provided for people with physical health problems.

Background

Mental health issues account for 23% of all ill health but they receive only 13% of NHS spending. Just 25% of adults with depression or anxiety get any treatment at all and demand for mental health services is increasing. The Mental Health Policy Group (MHPG) estimates that by 2030, 2m more adults will be affected. The 2015 budget committed an extra £1.25bn for mental health, to enable the NHS to treat 100,000 young people by 2020. But MHPG believes that spending needs to be increased by at least an extra 10% in real terms by 2020, to achieve parity.

Talking points

  • There is an inequality in care funding, meaning that spending on mental health does not match demand.
  • With calls for more joined-up care, should funding decisions be split between an arbitrary divide of mental and physical health?

More information

Mind

Centre for Mental Health

NFWI public affairs team presentation (PowerPoint)

Voting process

After reading the background notes, find your Resolution Selection form and make your mark (X) against the ONE resolution that you support the most.

Cut out the form and give it to Rebecca Bennett at the December meeting, or scan and send it to Rebecca at nunheadwi@gmail.com.

Resolution 5: First Aid to save lives

Resolution

The NFWI considers that suffering could be minimised and lives could be saved if more members of the general population were trained in first aid. We propose that HM Government should promote first aid training in schools, colleges, universities and in the workplace. Furthermore, that all WIs should support and encourage first aid training and volunteer as first aiders in their communities so that we become a safer and better-informed country ready to help save lives.’

Background

First aid can buy vital time until professional help arrives, but only 7% of people in the UK would be confident that they could perform emergency first aid. There is no requirement to teach first aid in UK schools or workplaces. Yet evidence shows that up to twice as many people survive cardiac arrest in countries where there is. WI members can train to be Community First Responders, providing care until the ambulance arrives.

Talking points

  • First-aid training offers valuable skills designed to help people cope in emergencies – it can save lives.
  • Do we need mandatory training to make a difference?

More information

 British Heart Foundation

St John Ambulance

NFWI public affairs team presentation (PowerPoint)

Voting process

After reading the background notes, find your Resolution Selection form and make your mark (X) against the ONE resolution that you support the most.

Cut out the form and give it to Rebecca Bennett at the December meeting, or scan and send it to Rebecca at nunheadwi@gmail.com.

(You can also pop it through her door at 8A Ansdell Road, but make sure it’s in an envelope and clearly marked and has your name on)

Resolution 4: Prevention of sudden cardiac death in young adults in the UK

Resolution

Every week in the UK an at least 12 apparently fit and healthy young people die suddenly from undetected cardiac abnormalities. The majority of these deaths are preventable. This meeting urges Her Majesty’s Government to put in place a national strategy for the prevention of young sudden cardiac death to ensure that all young people between the ages of 14 and 35 have access to heart screening by appropriately qualified professionals to identify any potentially life-threatening conditions.

Background.

Young Sudden Cardiac Death (YSCD) is one of the biggest killers of people aged 35 and under in the UK. Campaigners argue that many of these deaths can be prevented as the underlying heart abnormalities can be detected by screening with electrocardiograms. However, the effectiveness of this approach has been questioned. In July 2015 the National Screening Committee recommended that a universal screening programme should not be introduced.

Talking points

  • Deaths may be preventable, but is doing nothing an option?
  • Would the resolution reverse the decision by the National Screening Committee?

More information

Cardiac Risk in the Young

National Screening Committee

NFWI public affairs team presentation (PowerPoint)

Voting process

After reading the background notes, find your Resolution Selection form and make your mark (X) against the ONE resolution that you support the most.

Cut out the form and give it to Rebecca Bennett at the December meeting, or scan and send it to Rebecca at nunheadwi@gmail.com.

Resolution 3: Free sanitary protection for homeless women

Resolution

We call upon WIs to campaign for homeless shelters to be provided with a funding allowance to enable them to provide sanitary protection (tampons and towels) for homeless women.

Background

Menstruation is often a real problem for homeless women. Thanks to grant funding, items such as condoms and razors are routinely available to shelters, but sanitary wear is not consistently provided – an inequity campaigners say is grossly unfair. Even where it is on offer, not all women can access it.

For women struggling to find money for food or shelter from the cold, sanitary products become unaffordable.

Talking points

  • Three young people launched a petition earlier this year, calling for free sanitary products for homeless woman. It has now secured more than 100,000 signatures.
  • The WI has an unrivalled network of groups across England, Wales and the islands, so we are in a position to raise awareness and support efforts locally to ensure that all shelters have access to sanitary products.

More information

The Homeless Period

St Mungo’s Broadway

NFWI public affairs team presentation (PowerPoint)

Voting process

After reading the background notes, find your Resolution Selection form and make your mark (X) against the ONE resolution that you support the most.

Cut out the form and give it to Rebecca Bennett at the December meeting, or scan and send it to Rebecca at nunheadwi@gmail.com.

Resolution 2: British fruit: reviving our heritage

Resolution

This meeting calls on the WI to spearhead a national campaign that creates a fruit revival in local communities, celebrates our WI roots, promotes health, addresses food security and reduces the carbon footprint.

Background

The UK is only 12% self-sufficient in fruit production. That we import 88% of our fruit is not only bad news for British growers, but also for British consumers in terms of taste and nutritional value. Britons are losing touch with British fruit. The Government and consumers alike must do more to promote domestic fruit production.

Talking points

  • The WI’s Great Food Debates highlighted concern about people’s lost connection to food. Would this resolution help  to teach new skills, promote healthy eating and contribute to the nation’s domestic food supply?
  • This resolution covers a number of complex issues and many WIs will have discussed them as part of the WI Great Food Debate.

More information

Incredible Edible Network

British Growers Association

NFWI public affairs presentation (PowerPoint)

Voting process

After reading the background notes, find your Resolution Selection form and make your mark (X) against the ONE resolution that you support the most.

Cut out the form and give it to Rebecca Bennett at the December meeting, or scan and send it to Rebecca at nunheadwi@gmail.com.